Fellman gives final session

Dave Fellman is giving his final print sales training session today, with Sydney printers in attendance at the one day event in Pyrmont.

Fellman is acknowledged as the world’s leading print sales trainers, and is  teaching print sales from a lifetime of success in the field..

He discussed value and pain for customers, pivot points which can decide a sale, and win print work from competitors.

He also went into detail on the strike zone, the work a print business is best able to provide, and the importance of not swinging the bat at every opportunity.

He says, "Value, service, and price. Customers always want those three things, and it is a running joke for print providers to say pick two.

"I would rather focus on value and customer service, and charge a premium price for a premium service.

"Essentially, what you' ae really asking a new customer is to trust you though. Value, service, and price are promises when they are not familiar with you. So the question the customer is really asking themselves is, do I trust this person?"

The Sydney event was well attended by leading print personalities, including Mark Shergill, Charles Batt, and Anthony Bouggas.

Today’s presentation wraps up a four city tour for Fellman, who has been brought over by Australian Printer in association with the PIAA.

Australian Printer editor Wayne Robinson says, “There are few world class print sales training events that Aussie printers can attend, so it has bene a pleasure for us to bring Fellman over. The  feedback we have been getting from print business owners and sales people has been tremendous.”

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